Lesley Moffit: Practical Arts Teacher

The handwork and practical arts curriculum in the Waldorf School stimulates the creative powers, while at the same it establishes aesthetic confidence through the conscious guidance of the student’s developing will. The will is the power within us, through our deeds, to interact with the world. But most importantly, this will activity lays the foundation for our thinking.

Brain research has found that using the hands opens up neurological pathways that would otherwise atrophy.

We want the children to make things they love and enjoy, to work skillfully, always increasing their artistry. These lessons support and complement other subjects in the school, helping to bring balance and wholeness to the education.  Will-Developed Intelligence by David Mitchell and Patricia Livingston

"It's calming and fun. I designed my own pattern."

“It’s calming and fun. I designed my own pattern.”

"It's quiet and fun and I get work with my hands"

“It’s quiet and fun and I get work with my hands”

"I like that instead of getting  a hat at a store I get to make and choose my colours and fix my mistakes"

“I like that instead of getting a hat at a store I get to make and choose my colours and fix my mistakes”

That I can make stuff. For Christmas two years ago our Mom's mom got a knitting book to make animals. So I am making a pig one now."

That I can make stuff. For Christmas two years ago our Mom’s mom got a knitting book to make animals. So I am making a pig one now using multi-colours.”

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